National Cheng Kung University Hospital Department of Family Medicine
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2017 -- Conference report inside the country

  • The Association among Sleep Duration, Sleep Quality and Uric Acid levels in a Taiwanese Population 著作人:Yu-Tsung Chou, Zih-Jie Sun, Hsiang-Ju Cheng , Feng-Hua Lu , Yi-Ching Yang, Chih-Jen Chang, Jin-Shang Wu:
  • Abstract:
    周佑聰、孫子傑、鄭翔如、盧豐華、楊宜青、張智仁、吳晉祥:某台灣族群睡眠時數、睡眠品質與血液中尿酸濃度之相關性研究 台灣家庭醫學醫學會106年度學術研討會會刊 P107-108.
    Yu-Tsung Chou, Zih-Jie Sun, Hsiang-Ju Cheng , Feng-Hua Lu , Yi-Ching Yang, Chih-Jen Chang, Jin-Shang Wu: The Association among Sleep Duration, Sleep Quality and Uric Acid levels in a Taiwanese Population
    Background/Aims:
    Hyperuricemia is one of most common metabolic disorders in modern society. Previous studies revealed that uric acid levels were related to certain medical condition such as chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. However, studies also showed the beneficial roles of uric acid for its anti-oxidative and neuroprotective effects. Sleep deprivation and disturbance are also important health problems which are related to certain medical conditions. Sleep-disordered breathing such as obstructive sleep apnea was elucidated to be associated with hyperuricemia. However, studies investigating the relationship between sleep parameters and uric acid levels were scarce. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the association of sleep duration and quality with uric acid levels in a Taiwanese population.
    Methods:
    A total of 7586subjects with age 18 years or more were enrolled after excluding individuals with medication for hyperuricemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus or dyslipidemia, history of obstructive sleep apnea and incomplete data. The uric acid levels were divided into normal (uric acid level <7mg/dl in males and uric acid level<6mg/dl in females, respectively), mild hyperuricemia (uric acid level 7-10mg/dl in males and 6-10mg/dl in females, respectively), and severe hyperuricemia (uric acid level >10mg/dl in both genders) based on serum uric acid levels. The sleep duration was classified into three groups: short (< 6 h), normal (6~8 h), and long (> 8 h). We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to evaluate sleep quality and poor sleep quality was defined as a global PSQI score greater than 5.
    Results:
    The prevalence of hyperuricemia and poor sleeper were28.2% and 60.6%, respectively. In total subjects, good sleeper had a higher uric acid level than poor sleepers. In subgroup with normal uric acid level, good sleepers also had a significantly higher uric acid level than poor sleepers (5.39mg/dl versus5.22mg/dl, p<0.001). However, the uric acid level was not significantly different between good and poor sleepers in subgroup with mild and severe hyperuricemia. Multiple linear regression showed that good sleep quality was positively associated with uric acid level in subjects with normal uric acid level (b coefficient= -0.048, 95% CI: -0.095 ~ -0.002, p=0.043) after adjustment for other clinical variables. In patient with severe hyperuricemia, poor sleep quality seemed to be positively related to uric acid level (b coefficient=0.452, 95% CI: -0.068 ~ 0.972,p=0.087), but the statistics did not reach a significant level. In subject with mild hyperuricemia, sleep quality was not related to uric acid level. In addition, sleep duration was not independently related to uric acid levels in all the subgroups with normal uric acid level, mild hyperuricemia and severe hyperuricemia.
    Conclusions:
    In subjects with normal uric acid levels, good sleep quality was associated with a higher uric acid level. In contrast, subjected with severe hyperuricemia, poor sleep quality had a trend to be related to a higher uric acid level. Besides, there was an insignificant association between sleep duration and uric acid levels.