National Cheng Kung University Hospital Department of Family Medicine
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2017 -- Conference report inside the country

  • The Association between Coffee Consumption and Colorectal Adenoma in a Taiwanese Population 著作人:Hsing-Jung Lee, Jin-Shang Wu, Nai-Yi Shin, Chih-Jen Chang,Hsiang-Ju Cheng, Yi-Ching Yang, Feng-Hua Lu:
  • Abstract:
    李幸容、吳晉祥、辛乃逸、張智仁、鄭翔如、楊宜青、盧豐華:某台灣族群飲用咖啡與大腸腺瘤相關性之研究 台灣家庭醫學醫學會106年度學術研討會會刊 P116-117.
    Hsing-Jung Lee, Jin-Shang Wu, Nai-Yi Shin, Chih-Jen Chang,Hsiang-Ju Cheng, Yi-Ching Yang, Feng-Hua Lu: The Association between Coffee Consumption and Colorectal Adenoma in a Taiwanese Population
    Background/Aims:
    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in Taiwan. Early detection of colon polyps, especially adenomatous polyps, is important, because colon polyps may progress into colorectal cancer. Evidence has shown that coffee drinking is related to a decreased risk of some types of cancers including colorectal cancer. There is still a controversial for the relationship between coffee consumption and colorectal adenoma. In this study, we evaluated the association between coffee intake and colorectal adenoma in a large group of asymptomatic individuals under carefully adjusting other confounding factors.
    Methods:
    This is a cross-sectional study including9,575adult ≥18 years old years who received a voluntary health examination with colonoscopy at the health examination center of a medical center in Tainan, Taiwan. Eighty three subjects were excluded because of pathology showing malignancy (n=39), past history of colon cancer (n=3), familial adenomatous polyposis (n=1), Peutz–Jeghers syndrome (n=1), colorectomy (n=7) and incomplete data (n=28). To categorize current status of coffee drinking, we divided subjects into consumers and non-consumers, initially. Then, the subjects were divided into three groups: no drinking, an average of 1-2 times per week and ≥ 3 times per week. The subjects received screening colonoscopy by a standard protocol. Based on macro- and microscopic findings, we classified colonoscopic findings into three groups: polyp-free (n=7,350), non-neoplastic polyps (n=916), and adenoma(n=1230).
    Results:
    A total of 9496 subjects, with mean age of 51.2 ± 11.9 years, were included in this study. The prevalence of colorectal adenoma were 14.7%, 11.8%, and 10.3% in non-consumers, coffee consumers with1-2 per week and ≥ 3 per week, respectively (test for trend, p<0.001). Multinomial logistic regression showed that coffee consuming vs non-consuming was inversely associated with non-neoplastic polyp (OR: 0.80 ,95%CI: 0.69-0.93) and colorectal adenoma (OR: 0.72, 95%CI: 0.62-0.82), after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, family history of colorectal cancer, coffee consuming, current smoking, alcohol drinking and regular exercise. In another model, coffee consumptionsof1-2 times per week vs non-consuming (OR 0.72, 95% 0.63-0.84) and ≥ 3 times per week vs non-consuming (OR 0.69, 95% 0.55-0.87) were negatively associated with colorectal adenoma.
    Conclusions:
    Coffee drinking, even 1-2 times/week, was associated with a lower risk of colorectal adenoma in this asymptomatic population. More studies are needed to clarify the relationship between the amount of coffee drinking and colorectal adenoma